deep_sea_ocean
deep_sea_ocean
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buzzfeed:

Kids are basically tiny drunk adults.
buzzfeed:

Kids are basically tiny drunk adults.
buzzfeed:

Kids are basically tiny drunk adults.
buzzfeed:

Kids are basically tiny drunk adults.
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Forever and ever amen #vsco #vscocam
BENOIT AQUIN
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humansofnewyork:

"We were twenty-five and twenty-eight, but we acted like fifteen year olds. Fighting over little things, storming off, breaking up for a week and then getting back together. But developmentally, we were fifteen year olds. We’d been in the closet our whole lives, so we didn’t have any practice with relationships. He still hadn’t come out to his family and a lot of his friends. We were on one of our ‘little breaks’ when he died suddenly from a seizure. And nobody in his family or circle knew I existed. It took me four months to find out that he died. I thought he’d just decided never to talk to me again. His family never found out about me. Or him, for that matter."
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vicemag:

Garry Winogrand’s American Epic
Winogrand was a photographer of people, from rodeo performers in Texas to socialites in Manhattan to the regulars at Venice Beach. Humanity—or perhaps American humanity—in all its iterations and range of expression, was his subject matter.
vicemag:

Garry Winogrand’s American Epic
Winogrand was a photographer of people, from rodeo performers in Texas to socialites in Manhattan to the regulars at Venice Beach. Humanity—or perhaps American humanity—in all its iterations and range of expression, was his subject matter.
vicemag:

Garry Winogrand’s American Epic
Winogrand was a photographer of people, from rodeo performers in Texas to socialites in Manhattan to the regulars at Venice Beach. Humanity—or perhaps American humanity—in all its iterations and range of expression, was his subject matter.
vicemag:

Garry Winogrand’s American Epic
Winogrand was a photographer of people, from rodeo performers in Texas to socialites in Manhattan to the regulars at Venice Beach. Humanity—or perhaps American humanity—in all its iterations and range of expression, was his subject matter.
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adultrunaway:

this is #truth
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nevver:

Errol Morris
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smartgirlsattheparty:

faustus-syndrome:

Some art-quotes from Carol Rossetti Facebook | Tumblr

Some great stuff here :) 
smartgirlsattheparty:

faustus-syndrome:

Some art-quotes from Carol Rossetti Facebook | Tumblr

Some great stuff here :) 
smartgirlsattheparty:

faustus-syndrome:

Some art-quotes from Carol Rossetti Facebook | Tumblr

Some great stuff here :) 
smartgirlsattheparty:

faustus-syndrome:

Some art-quotes from Carol Rossetti Facebook | Tumblr

Some great stuff here :) 
smartgirlsattheparty:

faustus-syndrome:

Some art-quotes from Carol Rossetti Facebook | Tumblr

Some great stuff here :) 
smartgirlsattheparty:

faustus-syndrome:

Some art-quotes from Carol Rossetti Facebook | Tumblr

Some great stuff here :) 
smartgirlsattheparty:

faustus-syndrome:

Some art-quotes from Carol Rossetti Facebook | Tumblr

Some great stuff here :) 
smartgirlsattheparty:

faustus-syndrome:

Some art-quotes from Carol Rossetti Facebook | Tumblr

Some great stuff here :) 
smartgirlsattheparty:

faustus-syndrome:

Some art-quotes from Carol Rossetti Facebook | Tumblr

Some great stuff here :) 
smartgirlsattheparty:

faustus-syndrome:

Some art-quotes from Carol Rossetti Facebook | Tumblr

Some great stuff here :) 
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vicemag:

A Womb of Her Own: DIY Abortion and Birth Control After Hobby Lobby
On Tuesday, I was wandering around the internet and fell into a random binder full of women, which it turns out is a great place to meet badass genius revolutionaries. Jane Doe is adoula and an underground abortion provider. She writes romance novels, dreams of expatriation, and makes the best sea-salt caramels you’ve ever had. She’s spoken at statehouses and chased down riot cops. In the wake of the US Supreme Court’s decision that corporations like Hobby Lobby are people with important religious beliefs about contraception (and that men need Viagra but women don’t need birth control), she released a DIY guide to the basics of abortion, birth control, emergency contraception, and more. We got together in a hidden pocket of the binder so I could ask her for the details.
VICE: Why did you write this guide?Jane Doe: That’s a complicated question. About ten years ago, I wrote a guide to surgical abortions after South Dakota banned all abortions in that state. Since that time, I’ve learned a lot, and I’ve been receiving—at least once a month or so—emails from desperate women who find my surgical abortion how-to and want to abort their pregnancies. For a long time, I didn’t know what to tell them, and then I found out more about medical abortion—how safe it is (especially compared to birth), how women are undergoing medical abortions at home, in privacy, and how there’s a law that lets anyone in the United States import up to 90 days of any non-scheduled prescription drug.
From there, I started actually giving away the pills to women who emailed me—a proposition that became both expensive and incredibly (legally) risky.
Then I started sending them URLs to websites that sold the pills—which is when I thought, Wait, what am I doing? I could be letting people know all of this information, everything I know about how to find these medications, how to use them, what to do if something goes wrong.
I think this information belongs to women. It’s ours. And now it’s out there. Once it’s on the Internet, it’s hard to scrub.
Were you inspired by the Supreme Court decision or was the timing purely coincidental?I’d been working on A Womb of One’s Own for about six months in total, and like many writers tend to do, I found myself procrastinating toward the end of the project. When the Hobby Lobby decision came down, and I realized the Supreme Court wasn’t actually saying that all religious expression was protected—just things pertaining to women’s health—I dropped everything else on my plate and finished the pamphlet that day.
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