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deep_sea_ocean
Paradiesli - CHRISTIAN NEUENSCHWANDER
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mullitover:

JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

STEPHEN MARK: As a four year old I wanted to be a tramp. Maybe it had something to do with being outdoors. I was often found standing under torrential rain while everyone else was warm inside. I still do it now, just with a camera in my hand.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

SM: In this digital age, I’m constantly drawn back to researching traditional photographic techniques. Like many landscape photographers, I’m a big fan of Ansel Adams and I’m currently revisiting The Zone System using Adam’s book The Negative.

JC: What are you up to right now?

SM: I am married to Sarah and we recently had our first child, so I am enjoying my new role as a dad. I work as a Creative Trainer for a leading technology company based in California.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

SM: I’ve met lots of inspirational people along the way, but the people who have made the biggest impact on my creativity are not creative types at all. They have helped hone my ability to communicate and have given me a grounding in what’s really important in life.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

SM: I live in a village in Liverpool where Paul McCartney and John Lennon met. The city has a heritage of creativity, and you can feel it when you walk around town. It has to be the friendliest city in the world.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

SM: In all you do, try to maintain an enjoyment of your craft. I reached a point soon after graduating, where the sound of the shutter release wasn’t followed by the sound of money. We produce for others to consume, but it is so important to keep something just for you, to remind yourself why you picked up the camera in the first place. For me, that’s going out into the wilderness to find some solitude, regardless of how many prints result from my time there.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

SM: It can be good sometimes to step back and evaluate what’s really important. We get so consumed by our work, but if we’re not careful it can be to the detriment of those around us. In many ways, I have chosen to make photography my Plan B because being a husband and a dad is my Plan A.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

SM: It is so important to be part of a community, but i’m not overly concerned if it’s not made up of creatives. There is a lot to be said for spending time with people you have nothing in common with.

@mullitovercc

This guy
mullitover:

JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

STEPHEN MARK: As a four year old I wanted to be a tramp. Maybe it had something to do with being outdoors. I was often found standing under torrential rain while everyone else was warm inside. I still do it now, just with a camera in my hand.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

SM: In this digital age, I’m constantly drawn back to researching traditional photographic techniques. Like many landscape photographers, I’m a big fan of Ansel Adams and I’m currently revisiting The Zone System using Adam’s book The Negative.

JC: What are you up to right now?

SM: I am married to Sarah and we recently had our first child, so I am enjoying my new role as a dad. I work as a Creative Trainer for a leading technology company based in California.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

SM: I’ve met lots of inspirational people along the way, but the people who have made the biggest impact on my creativity are not creative types at all. They have helped hone my ability to communicate and have given me a grounding in what’s really important in life.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

SM: I live in a village in Liverpool where Paul McCartney and John Lennon met. The city has a heritage of creativity, and you can feel it when you walk around town. It has to be the friendliest city in the world.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

SM: In all you do, try to maintain an enjoyment of your craft. I reached a point soon after graduating, where the sound of the shutter release wasn’t followed by the sound of money. We produce for others to consume, but it is so important to keep something just for you, to remind yourself why you picked up the camera in the first place. For me, that’s going out into the wilderness to find some solitude, regardless of how many prints result from my time there.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

SM: It can be good sometimes to step back and evaluate what’s really important. We get so consumed by our work, but if we’re not careful it can be to the detriment of those around us. In many ways, I have chosen to make photography my Plan B because being a husband and a dad is my Plan A.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

SM: It is so important to be part of a community, but i’m not overly concerned if it’s not made up of creatives. There is a lot to be said for spending time with people you have nothing in common with.

@mullitovercc

This guy
mullitover:

JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

STEPHEN MARK: As a four year old I wanted to be a tramp. Maybe it had something to do with being outdoors. I was often found standing under torrential rain while everyone else was warm inside. I still do it now, just with a camera in my hand.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

SM: In this digital age, I’m constantly drawn back to researching traditional photographic techniques. Like many landscape photographers, I’m a big fan of Ansel Adams and I’m currently revisiting The Zone System using Adam’s book The Negative.

JC: What are you up to right now?

SM: I am married to Sarah and we recently had our first child, so I am enjoying my new role as a dad. I work as a Creative Trainer for a leading technology company based in California.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

SM: I’ve met lots of inspirational people along the way, but the people who have made the biggest impact on my creativity are not creative types at all. They have helped hone my ability to communicate and have given me a grounding in what’s really important in life.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

SM: I live in a village in Liverpool where Paul McCartney and John Lennon met. The city has a heritage of creativity, and you can feel it when you walk around town. It has to be the friendliest city in the world.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

SM: In all you do, try to maintain an enjoyment of your craft. I reached a point soon after graduating, where the sound of the shutter release wasn’t followed by the sound of money. We produce for others to consume, but it is so important to keep something just for you, to remind yourself why you picked up the camera in the first place. For me, that’s going out into the wilderness to find some solitude, regardless of how many prints result from my time there.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

SM: It can be good sometimes to step back and evaluate what’s really important. We get so consumed by our work, but if we’re not careful it can be to the detriment of those around us. In many ways, I have chosen to make photography my Plan B because being a husband and a dad is my Plan A.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

SM: It is so important to be part of a community, but i’m not overly concerned if it’s not made up of creatives. There is a lot to be said for spending time with people you have nothing in common with.

@mullitovercc

This guy
mullitover:

JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

STEPHEN MARK: As a four year old I wanted to be a tramp. Maybe it had something to do with being outdoors. I was often found standing under torrential rain while everyone else was warm inside. I still do it now, just with a camera in my hand.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

SM: In this digital age, I’m constantly drawn back to researching traditional photographic techniques. Like many landscape photographers, I’m a big fan of Ansel Adams and I’m currently revisiting The Zone System using Adam’s book The Negative.

JC: What are you up to right now?

SM: I am married to Sarah and we recently had our first child, so I am enjoying my new role as a dad. I work as a Creative Trainer for a leading technology company based in California.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

SM: I’ve met lots of inspirational people along the way, but the people who have made the biggest impact on my creativity are not creative types at all. They have helped hone my ability to communicate and have given me a grounding in what’s really important in life.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

SM: I live in a village in Liverpool where Paul McCartney and John Lennon met. The city has a heritage of creativity, and you can feel it when you walk around town. It has to be the friendliest city in the world.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

SM: In all you do, try to maintain an enjoyment of your craft. I reached a point soon after graduating, where the sound of the shutter release wasn’t followed by the sound of money. We produce for others to consume, but it is so important to keep something just for you, to remind yourself why you picked up the camera in the first place. For me, that’s going out into the wilderness to find some solitude, regardless of how many prints result from my time there.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

SM: It can be good sometimes to step back and evaluate what’s really important. We get so consumed by our work, but if we’re not careful it can be to the detriment of those around us. In many ways, I have chosen to make photography my Plan B because being a husband and a dad is my Plan A.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

SM: It is so important to be part of a community, but i’m not overly concerned if it’s not made up of creatives. There is a lot to be said for spending time with people you have nothing in common with.

@mullitovercc

This guy
mullitover:

JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

STEPHEN MARK: As a four year old I wanted to be a tramp. Maybe it had something to do with being outdoors. I was often found standing under torrential rain while everyone else was warm inside. I still do it now, just with a camera in my hand.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

SM: In this digital age, I’m constantly drawn back to researching traditional photographic techniques. Like many landscape photographers, I’m a big fan of Ansel Adams and I’m currently revisiting The Zone System using Adam’s book The Negative.

JC: What are you up to right now?

SM: I am married to Sarah and we recently had our first child, so I am enjoying my new role as a dad. I work as a Creative Trainer for a leading technology company based in California.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

SM: I’ve met lots of inspirational people along the way, but the people who have made the biggest impact on my creativity are not creative types at all. They have helped hone my ability to communicate and have given me a grounding in what’s really important in life.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

SM: I live in a village in Liverpool where Paul McCartney and John Lennon met. The city has a heritage of creativity, and you can feel it when you walk around town. It has to be the friendliest city in the world.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

SM: In all you do, try to maintain an enjoyment of your craft. I reached a point soon after graduating, where the sound of the shutter release wasn’t followed by the sound of money. We produce for others to consume, but it is so important to keep something just for you, to remind yourself why you picked up the camera in the first place. For me, that’s going out into the wilderness to find some solitude, regardless of how many prints result from my time there.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

SM: It can be good sometimes to step back and evaluate what’s really important. We get so consumed by our work, but if we’re not careful it can be to the detriment of those around us. In many ways, I have chosen to make photography my Plan B because being a husband and a dad is my Plan A.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

SM: It is so important to be part of a community, but i’m not overly concerned if it’s not made up of creatives. There is a lot to be said for spending time with people you have nothing in common with.

@mullitovercc

This guy
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nevver:

Design Crush
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nevver:

July in August
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#whitagram #vsco #collage
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mizzmeanreds:

#Repost from @a_feminist_lenz #RupiKaur #feminism #feminist #poem #poetry
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nevver:

Don’t get me
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mullitover:

JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

JUAN ABALLE: As a child I don’t remember having many plans for the future, but I truly loved music and going to the movies (I clearly remember leaving the movie theater absolutely impressed after watching E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial). When I was 15, I got my first camera (a 35mm compact) and started to document my life as an exchange student in Fort Wayne, Indiana. Ever since, I’ve been hooked on photography.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

JA: I’m constantly inspired by films, literature, painting and of course, lots of photography (the lists could be endless). Right now I’m reading My Last Breath by spanish filmmaker Luis Buñuel, whom I find fascinating. While working on my last project I’ve also been inspired by the work of many great american authors like John Steinbeck, Raymond Carver, John Cheever or Cormac MacArthy.

JC: What are you up to right now?

JA: I’ve been travelling a lot this year, mostly thanks to a film commission in Latin America. Now back in Madrid (Spain), I’m starting to prepare an exhibition and a photobook about my last project Country Fictions.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

JA: The best mentors I’ve had are a few close friends and family members who believed in my work. They have always encouraged me to keep doing these things that don’t necessarily have to do with making money.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

JA: After years abroad I’m now based in Madrid, the city where I was born. These years in Madrid have been fundamental in the development of my last project; the friends I have lived with, the times in our lives, the many roads leaving the city to reach very different corners of the Iberian Peninsula…

The places where I’ve been based have always had a huge influence on me and my work. Living in the USA or moving to Berlin in the mid 90’s were vital experiences that have shaped who I am and what I do.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

JA: Think about what you are doing and specially about why you are doing it. If it is true and comes from inside, go for it with all your heart.

I once got to interview Todd Hido and one of the questions was quite similar. I believe his answer is also a great piece of advise for all photograpers who are starting their career: print your images. A photograph on a piece of paper is a fantastic object.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

JA: Whether it is plan B, C or D, photography will always be a huge part of my life.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

JA: For me the creative process is quite a lonely one. Of course I keep in touch with a few good friends who are also mad about photography and we talk about our work, our interests and our creative troubles. Such conversations help a lot bringing fresh air into one’s own little world, but in the end making the images and editing the work means taking many (difficult) decisions, which in my case, are very personal ones.

@mullitovercc
mullitover:

JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

JUAN ABALLE: As a child I don’t remember having many plans for the future, but I truly loved music and going to the movies (I clearly remember leaving the movie theater absolutely impressed after watching E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial). When I was 15, I got my first camera (a 35mm compact) and started to document my life as an exchange student in Fort Wayne, Indiana. Ever since, I’ve been hooked on photography.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

JA: I’m constantly inspired by films, literature, painting and of course, lots of photography (the lists could be endless). Right now I’m reading My Last Breath by spanish filmmaker Luis Buñuel, whom I find fascinating. While working on my last project I’ve also been inspired by the work of many great american authors like John Steinbeck, Raymond Carver, John Cheever or Cormac MacArthy.

JC: What are you up to right now?

JA: I’ve been travelling a lot this year, mostly thanks to a film commission in Latin America. Now back in Madrid (Spain), I’m starting to prepare an exhibition and a photobook about my last project Country Fictions.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

JA: The best mentors I’ve had are a few close friends and family members who believed in my work. They have always encouraged me to keep doing these things that don’t necessarily have to do with making money.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

JA: After years abroad I’m now based in Madrid, the city where I was born. These years in Madrid have been fundamental in the development of my last project; the friends I have lived with, the times in our lives, the many roads leaving the city to reach very different corners of the Iberian Peninsula…

The places where I’ve been based have always had a huge influence on me and my work. Living in the USA or moving to Berlin in the mid 90’s were vital experiences that have shaped who I am and what I do.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

JA: Think about what you are doing and specially about why you are doing it. If it is true and comes from inside, go for it with all your heart.

I once got to interview Todd Hido and one of the questions was quite similar. I believe his answer is also a great piece of advise for all photograpers who are starting their career: print your images. A photograph on a piece of paper is a fantastic object.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

JA: Whether it is plan B, C or D, photography will always be a huge part of my life.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

JA: For me the creative process is quite a lonely one. Of course I keep in touch with a few good friends who are also mad about photography and we talk about our work, our interests and our creative troubles. Such conversations help a lot bringing fresh air into one’s own little world, but in the end making the images and editing the work means taking many (difficult) decisions, which in my case, are very personal ones.

@mullitovercc
mullitover:

JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

JUAN ABALLE: As a child I don’t remember having many plans for the future, but I truly loved music and going to the movies (I clearly remember leaving the movie theater absolutely impressed after watching E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial). When I was 15, I got my first camera (a 35mm compact) and started to document my life as an exchange student in Fort Wayne, Indiana. Ever since, I’ve been hooked on photography.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

JA: I’m constantly inspired by films, literature, painting and of course, lots of photography (the lists could be endless). Right now I’m reading My Last Breath by spanish filmmaker Luis Buñuel, whom I find fascinating. While working on my last project I’ve also been inspired by the work of many great american authors like John Steinbeck, Raymond Carver, John Cheever or Cormac MacArthy.

JC: What are you up to right now?

JA: I’ve been travelling a lot this year, mostly thanks to a film commission in Latin America. Now back in Madrid (Spain), I’m starting to prepare an exhibition and a photobook about my last project Country Fictions.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

JA: The best mentors I’ve had are a few close friends and family members who believed in my work. They have always encouraged me to keep doing these things that don’t necessarily have to do with making money.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

JA: After years abroad I’m now based in Madrid, the city where I was born. These years in Madrid have been fundamental in the development of my last project; the friends I have lived with, the times in our lives, the many roads leaving the city to reach very different corners of the Iberian Peninsula…

The places where I’ve been based have always had a huge influence on me and my work. Living in the USA or moving to Berlin in the mid 90’s were vital experiences that have shaped who I am and what I do.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

JA: Think about what you are doing and specially about why you are doing it. If it is true and comes from inside, go for it with all your heart.

I once got to interview Todd Hido and one of the questions was quite similar. I believe his answer is also a great piece of advise for all photograpers who are starting their career: print your images. A photograph on a piece of paper is a fantastic object.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

JA: Whether it is plan B, C or D, photography will always be a huge part of my life.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

JA: For me the creative process is quite a lonely one. Of course I keep in touch with a few good friends who are also mad about photography and we talk about our work, our interests and our creative troubles. Such conversations help a lot bringing fresh air into one’s own little world, but in the end making the images and editing the work means taking many (difficult) decisions, which in my case, are very personal ones.

@mullitovercc
mullitover:

JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

JUAN ABALLE: As a child I don’t remember having many plans for the future, but I truly loved music and going to the movies (I clearly remember leaving the movie theater absolutely impressed after watching E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial). When I was 15, I got my first camera (a 35mm compact) and started to document my life as an exchange student in Fort Wayne, Indiana. Ever since, I’ve been hooked on photography.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

JA: I’m constantly inspired by films, literature, painting and of course, lots of photography (the lists could be endless). Right now I’m reading My Last Breath by spanish filmmaker Luis Buñuel, whom I find fascinating. While working on my last project I’ve also been inspired by the work of many great american authors like John Steinbeck, Raymond Carver, John Cheever or Cormac MacArthy.

JC: What are you up to right now?

JA: I’ve been travelling a lot this year, mostly thanks to a film commission in Latin America. Now back in Madrid (Spain), I’m starting to prepare an exhibition and a photobook about my last project Country Fictions.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

JA: The best mentors I’ve had are a few close friends and family members who believed in my work. They have always encouraged me to keep doing these things that don’t necessarily have to do with making money.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

JA: After years abroad I’m now based in Madrid, the city where I was born. These years in Madrid have been fundamental in the development of my last project; the friends I have lived with, the times in our lives, the many roads leaving the city to reach very different corners of the Iberian Peninsula…

The places where I’ve been based have always had a huge influence on me and my work. Living in the USA or moving to Berlin in the mid 90’s were vital experiences that have shaped who I am and what I do.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

JA: Think about what you are doing and specially about why you are doing it. If it is true and comes from inside, go for it with all your heart.

I once got to interview Todd Hido and one of the questions was quite similar. I believe his answer is also a great piece of advise for all photograpers who are starting their career: print your images. A photograph on a piece of paper is a fantastic object.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

JA: Whether it is plan B, C or D, photography will always be a huge part of my life.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

JA: For me the creative process is quite a lonely one. Of course I keep in touch with a few good friends who are also mad about photography and we talk about our work, our interests and our creative troubles. Such conversations help a lot bringing fresh air into one’s own little world, but in the end making the images and editing the work means taking many (difficult) decisions, which in my case, are very personal ones.

@mullitovercc
mullitover:

JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

JUAN ABALLE: As a child I don’t remember having many plans for the future, but I truly loved music and going to the movies (I clearly remember leaving the movie theater absolutely impressed after watching E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial). When I was 15, I got my first camera (a 35mm compact) and started to document my life as an exchange student in Fort Wayne, Indiana. Ever since, I’ve been hooked on photography.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

JA: I’m constantly inspired by films, literature, painting and of course, lots of photography (the lists could be endless). Right now I’m reading My Last Breath by spanish filmmaker Luis Buñuel, whom I find fascinating. While working on my last project I’ve also been inspired by the work of many great american authors like John Steinbeck, Raymond Carver, John Cheever or Cormac MacArthy.

JC: What are you up to right now?

JA: I’ve been travelling a lot this year, mostly thanks to a film commission in Latin America. Now back in Madrid (Spain), I’m starting to prepare an exhibition and a photobook about my last project Country Fictions.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

JA: The best mentors I’ve had are a few close friends and family members who believed in my work. They have always encouraged me to keep doing these things that don’t necessarily have to do with making money.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

JA: After years abroad I’m now based in Madrid, the city where I was born. These years in Madrid have been fundamental in the development of my last project; the friends I have lived with, the times in our lives, the many roads leaving the city to reach very different corners of the Iberian Peninsula…

The places where I’ve been based have always had a huge influence on me and my work. Living in the USA or moving to Berlin in the mid 90’s were vital experiences that have shaped who I am and what I do.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

JA: Think about what you are doing and specially about why you are doing it. If it is true and comes from inside, go for it with all your heart.

I once got to interview Todd Hido and one of the questions was quite similar. I believe his answer is also a great piece of advise for all photograpers who are starting their career: print your images. A photograph on a piece of paper is a fantastic object.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

JA: Whether it is plan B, C or D, photography will always be a huge part of my life.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

JA: For me the creative process is quite a lonely one. Of course I keep in touch with a few good friends who are also mad about photography and we talk about our work, our interests and our creative troubles. Such conversations help a lot bringing fresh air into one’s own little world, but in the end making the images and editing the work means taking many (difficult) decisions, which in my case, are very personal ones.

@mullitovercc
mullitover:

JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

JUAN ABALLE: As a child I don’t remember having many plans for the future, but I truly loved music and going to the movies (I clearly remember leaving the movie theater absolutely impressed after watching E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial). When I was 15, I got my first camera (a 35mm compact) and started to document my life as an exchange student in Fort Wayne, Indiana. Ever since, I’ve been hooked on photography.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

JA: I’m constantly inspired by films, literature, painting and of course, lots of photography (the lists could be endless). Right now I’m reading My Last Breath by spanish filmmaker Luis Buñuel, whom I find fascinating. While working on my last project I’ve also been inspired by the work of many great american authors like John Steinbeck, Raymond Carver, John Cheever or Cormac MacArthy.

JC: What are you up to right now?

JA: I’ve been travelling a lot this year, mostly thanks to a film commission in Latin America. Now back in Madrid (Spain), I’m starting to prepare an exhibition and a photobook about my last project Country Fictions.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

JA: The best mentors I’ve had are a few close friends and family members who believed in my work. They have always encouraged me to keep doing these things that don’t necessarily have to do with making money.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

JA: After years abroad I’m now based in Madrid, the city where I was born. These years in Madrid have been fundamental in the development of my last project; the friends I have lived with, the times in our lives, the many roads leaving the city to reach very different corners of the Iberian Peninsula…

The places where I’ve been based have always had a huge influence on me and my work. Living in the USA or moving to Berlin in the mid 90’s were vital experiences that have shaped who I am and what I do.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

JA: Think about what you are doing and specially about why you are doing it. If it is true and comes from inside, go for it with all your heart.

I once got to interview Todd Hido and one of the questions was quite similar. I believe his answer is also a great piece of advise for all photograpers who are starting their career: print your images. A photograph on a piece of paper is a fantastic object.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

JA: Whether it is plan B, C or D, photography will always be a huge part of my life.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

JA: For me the creative process is quite a lonely one. Of course I keep in touch with a few good friends who are also mad about photography and we talk about our work, our interests and our creative troubles. Such conversations help a lot bringing fresh air into one’s own little world, but in the end making the images and editing the work means taking many (difficult) decisions, which in my case, are very personal ones.

@mullitovercc
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explore-blog:

Timeless wisdom on courage and evil from the late and great Maya Angelou.